Monday, 26 Oct 2020

What is China up to? Japan demands lingering Chinese ships leave as tensions erupt

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Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato said on Tuesday said: “The Chinese ships entered the Japanese territorial waters on October 11. “They continue to remain there, for more than two days already. This is extremely unfortunate.

“Japanese maritime security vessels reiterate the demand to leave Japan’s territorial waters.”

The islands in the East China Sea are part of Japanese territory.

However, China claim the uninhabited rocks are theirs, calling them the Diaoyu Islands.

China claims ownership based on 14th century maps.

But, Japan has had a constant presence their since 1895 until the end of World War 2, when the islands were briefly controlled by the US before being returned to Japan.

Toyko has now communicated with Beijing through diplomatic channels to protest the presence of Chinese vessels in its territory.

Mr Kato said: “Through diplomatic channels in Tokyo and Beijing, we continue to repeat our strong protest.

“We demand that the Chinese vessels stop approaching Japanese fishing ships and leave our country’s territorial waters as soon as possible.”

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China has been testing the resolve of nations to defend their maritime waters for some time now.

Beijing has deployed its naval vessels in disputed territory n the South China Sea causing tensions to rise in the region.

The last time Chinese vessels were in Japanese waters was in July, the vessels remained for 39 hours.

The islands may sit above extensive mineral resources below the seabed.

In 2012 the Japanese government purchased three of the five islands from the private owner to ensure they had sovereign control.

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